Shady Spots & Shipwrecks

For our second day in the Peloponnese, Jocelyn and I drove up to Polidroso (also known as Tsitsina, its Turkish name), a charming village in the Parnassos mountains. This was supposed to be our hottest day in this area, so a move to higher elevations made sense.

IMG_1419.jpg

We packed our hiking gear and headed north in our tiny car (which barely has an engine).

IMG_1351.jpg

The area around Polidroso is heavily wooded, filled with pine trees and rocky cliffs.

IMG_1355.jpg

We walked up a logging road…

IMG_1398.jpg

IMG_8255.jpg

… then clambered up, up, up a steep trail, and eventually found ourselves on another dirt road. This one was dotted with beehives.

IMG_1370.jpgIMG_1371.jpg

Jocelyn called this road “reptile way.”

Screen Shot 2018-06-15 at 8.38.51 PMIMG_1366.jpg

And there were beautiful wildflowers, too.

IMG_1384.jpg

The trails in this area are unusually well signed…

IMG_1380.jpg

… though we were not always so decisive.

IMG_8275.jpg

One of the wonderful things about the mountains in Lakonia is that there are public springs — often designed with fancy spouts — all over the place. In this case, we found one in the middle of our journey.

UOVM0958

IMG_1379.jpg

It was a hot and tiring hike — we enjoyed a rest at a small bridge near a very active dragonfly population near the bottom.

IMG_1387.jpg

Overall, though, we had a great hike…

IMG_8277.JPG

And I was glad to find another spring at the bottom of the trail!

IMG_8294.jpg

For lunch, we tried to go to my favorite inn, Pritanio, but it was closed! We stole a few of their cherries (thanks, Pritanio!).IMG_1405IMG_1414

We drove into the center of Polidroso and found the one place that was open, a small coffee shop. They served us a simple but elegantly presented late lunch.

IMG_1424.jpg

The town itself is great to walk around.

IMG_1434.jpgIMG_1432.jpg

Jocelyn then drove a long way down the mountains …

IMG_1441.jpg

… and to Valtaki beach near Gytheio. This beach is famous for the wreck of the ship Dimitrios, which hit the coast in 1981 and has been there ever since.

IMG_1446.jpg

We took about a million pictures here, because it is remarkably beautiful — and you can walk right up to it.

IMG_1453.jpg

It’s gorgeous up close.

IMG_1460.jpg

IMG_1471.jpg

Someone has done graffiti on the ship’s side (both professional-looking and not).

IMG_1482.jpg

IMG_1456.jpg

IMG_1474

I liked this letter “T” …

IMG_1472.jpg

… and I think that this rusted-out section looks like Singapore!

IMG_1473

We spent a long time investigating the hull.

IMG_1475.jpg

The beach itself was lovely, sandy with some nice rocks and a few shells (and empty of amenities save for a taverna on one else).

IMG_1476

If you’ve never seen a shipwreck up close, I would highly recommend it — what a fascinating (and unexpected) experience).

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

w

Connecting to %s